Monday, 22 Jul 2024

BWF News: The Positive Impact of Badminton Participation on Eye Health

On Sunday, the Badminton World Federation (BWF) and the National Badminton Federation of Russia (NBFR) unveiled the results of the Badminton Against Myopia Project during the BWF World Junior Championships in Kazan, Russia.

Reducing the Risk of Myopia Globally

Initiated in 2013, the Badminton Against Myopia Project aimed to address the rising prevalence of myopic eye disease among school-age children. Following extensive research by the Helmholtz Moscow Research Institute of Eye Diseases, the BWF and NBFR are excited to announce groundbreaking findings.

The Impact of Regular Badminton Participation

The study revealed that regular badminton participation has a positive effect on the functional capacity of the visual organ, marking the first scientific evidence of this correlation. Moreover, the report suggests that badminton may not only reduce the risk of myopia in children but also treat pseudo myopia, one of the most common forms of the condition.

A Global Issue Requires Global Solutions

With a quarter of the global population currently affected by myopia, and that number expected to double by 2050, the outcome of this project holds tremendous potential. BWF President Poul-Erik Høyer expressed his gratitude to the NBFR and President Sergey Shakhray for their leadership in this research endeavor and acknowledged the significance of these results for the future development of badminton.

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The Badminton Against Myopia Project: A Step Forward

President Høyer emphasized that the goal of the Badminton Against Myopia Project was to contribute to the control of progressive myopia, a disease that significantly impacts contemporary societies. The results obtained now provide compelling evidence that regular badminton could potentially reduce the risk of myopia in children. The project also highlights the value of the National Badminton Federation of Russia in driving this research.

The Path to Treatment and Prevention

The Helmholtz Moscow Research Institute of Eye Diseases initiated this study in 2013, aiming to identify the potential benefits of badminton for the prevention and treatment of myopia. Over an 18-month period, researchers observed Moscow school children aged seven to 11 who engaged in systematic badminton activities. The study reliably demonstrated the high efficiency of regular badminton in treating pseudo myopia, with some evidence suggesting complete resolution of false myopia through continued badminton play.

A New Strategy for Myopia Treatment

President Shakhray underlined the importance of badminton as a recommended strategy for treating myopia in children. Alongside existing medical treatments such as laser therapy and conservative approaches, badminton now emerges as the fourth strategy. President Høyer further emphasized that the findings from Russia could serve as an exemplary model for similar projects worldwide.

A Promising Future for Badminton

President Høyer acknowledged the participation advantages provided by badminton and expressed optimism for the integration of the Badminton Against Myopia Project into grassroots programs in Russia and globally. This success story paves the way for increased awareness of the health benefits of badminton and encourages greater participation among children.

Tham Khảo Thêm:  BWF News

FAQs

  • Q: How can badminton reduce the risk of myopia in children?
    A: Regular badminton participation has been shown to have a positive impact on the functional capacity of the visual organ, potentially reducing the risk of myopia in children.

  • Q: What types of myopia can badminton treat?
    A: Badminton has shown promise in treating pseudo myopia, which is one of the most common forms of the condition.

  • Q: Is badminton a suitable strategy for myopia treatment?
    A: Yes, badminton is now recognized as a recommended strategy for treating myopia in children, alongside other medical treatments.

Conclusion

The Badminton Against Myopia Project has yielded groundbreaking results, demonstrating the positive impact of regular badminton participation on eye health. With the prevalence of myopia on the rise globally, these findings provide hope for reducing the risk of myopia in children and treating various forms of the condition. As badminton continues to gain recognition as a valuable strategy, we can look forward to a future with more children playing badminton in more places. For more information on badminton and its benefits, visit Carnegiecentre.